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After having a break from checking progress for several weeks a return visit to look at the progress a few things have changed, but not many with the brand newly delivered tram/trains remaining firmly in the sidings at the depot. The link to the BR tracks is getting a little closer but not yet there.

The connection near to the old Parkgate & Rawmarsh station on the main line has  been installed . To the right is the end of the tram track so far.

Above insert left is a LMS 'Hawkeye' station TARGET ''PARKGATE & RAWMARSH''. From the ex Midland Railway station.  The railway foot bridge that possibly served the former railway station a few weeks later the span has been removed not by a passing train but presumably Network Rail as part of the construction work on the new tram station.

On November 19th 1926, 9 passengers were killed and 27 injured, in an accident near Parkgate and Rawmarsh station, when the wagons of a coal train became derailed and the wreckage, together with a signal post, ripped the side of the York to Bristol Express passenger train. For further information about this accident click here

Near to Meadowhall tracks and point work are nearing completion from what is called the Tinsley Cord where the tram tracks join the Network Rail tracks. In the background on the right is the new road bridge that links the Sheffield Road with Meadowhall that avoids the road traffic having to use the M1 access roundabout on the lower deck.

A visit to Brodsworth and Woodlands near Doncaster 31st October 2016

Brodsworth Colliery was a coal mine north west of Doncaster and west of the Great North Road. in South Yorkshire, England. Two shafts were sunk between October 1905 and 1907 in a joint venture by the Hickleton Main Colliery Company and the Staveley Coal and Iron Company. The colliery exploited the coal seams of the South Yorkshire Coalfield including the Barnsley seam which was reached at a depth of 595 yards and was up to 9 feet thick. After a third shaft was sunk in 1923, Brodsworth, the largest colliery in Yorkshire,
The colliery and five others were merged into Doncaster Amalgamated Collieries in 1937 and the National Coal Board in 1947. It closed in 1990.

One of the features of the colliery was the internal narrow gauge railway that could be found on the surface and in the underground workings.  The colliery has since been demolished and very little remains but fortunately some of the tubs have survived on the former site at the Markham Grange Nursery & Steam Museum. 

A visit to Woodlands near Doncaster 31st October 2016

The colliery was originally served  by the trams of the Doncaster Corporation Tramways on the Brodsworth route that was opened in 21/2/1916 operating as far as nearby Woodlands. The route finally gave way to motorbuses in June 1935. The buses operated closer to the colliery. Relics of the tramways survived a while longer, some of the rails were purchased and cut into pit prop lengths but proved to be unsuccessful. However the poles that once supported the overhead wires were re-sited and used to carry the 220 volt D.C. supply generated by the colliery to the pit houses.  Until recently many had survived, today only one has escaped being cut down having being made redundant many years ago when the houses were fed from the mains grid supply.

Some closer views of this surviving pole at the back of the houses of the junction box still with some cut off cables. The middle photograph shows the rust hidden behind what was the cast iron  decorative base.  I suspect the holes were put in for lifting the pole from the tramway.

"Reliant" steam tug at Brodsworth Doncaster 31st October 2016

Not much remains now of this 1907 steam tug boat that once operated on the Tyne. It was last used by the  Seaham Harbour Dock Company, Seaham in September 1956. In June 1969  the National Maritime Museum used part of the top deck but due to lack of space it was broken up in 1996 and the part of the stern put on display outside the Markham Main Steam Museum. However the port engine and a complete paddle wheel is on display at Markham Grange Steam Museum at Doncaster, now driven by a discreet 3/4 HP motor onto the paddle wheel rim. The feathering gear is arranged so that it can be demonstrated as a radial wheel and moved into the feathered mode.

All rights reserved, ©  Bob Ashton 2016